Photo 13 Dec 6 notes Tuna
Health Benefits
Tuna fish are truly a nutrient-dense food. An excellent source of high quality protein, tuna are rich in a variety of important nutrients including the minerals selenium, magnesium, and potassium; the B vitamins niacin, B1 and B6; and perhaps most important, the beneficial omega-3 essential fatty acids. Essential fatty acids are so named because they are essential for our health but cannot be made by the body; they must therefore be obtained from foods. Cold-water fish like tuna are a rich source of the omega-3 essential fats, a form of essential fatty acids in which the standard American diet is sorely deficient. (The other form of essential fatty acids, the omega-6s, are plentiful in a variety of commonly consumed oils such as corn and safflower oil. In fact, the omega-6s are so plentiful in the typical American diet that too much omega-6 is consumed in proportion to omega-3s—an imbalance that promotes inflammation, thus contributing to virtually every chronic disease in which inflammation is a key component.)

Tuna

Health Benefits

Tuna fish are truly a nutrient-dense food. An excellent source of high quality protein, tuna are rich in a variety of important nutrients including the minerals selenium, magnesium, and potassium; the B vitamins niacin, B1 and B6; and perhaps most important, the beneficial omega-3 essential fatty acids. Essential fatty acids are so named because they are essential for our health but cannot be made by the body; they must therefore be obtained from foods. Cold-water fish like tuna are a rich source of the omega-3 essential fats, a form of essential fatty acids in which the standard American diet is sorely deficient. (The other form of essential fatty acids, the omega-6s, are plentiful in a variety of commonly consumed oils such as corn and safflower oil. In fact, the omega-6s are so plentiful in the typical American diet that too much omega-6 is consumed in proportion to omega-3s—an imbalance that promotes inflammation, thus contributing to virtually every chronic disease in which inflammation is a key component.)

Photo 13 Dec 2 notes TurkeyWhat’s New and Beneficial about Turkey
Studies now show a clear difference between intake of red meats (like beef) and intake of white meats (like turkey) with respect to certain activities in our digestive tract. One particularly interesting study has determined that formation of N-nitroso compounds in the large intestine is much more likely to occur from high intake of red meats like beef than from high intake of white meats like turkey. Since excessive formation of N-nitroso compounds is associated with increased risk of colon cancer, this finding points to a special benefit that may be provided by turkey and other white meats in comparison to red meats.
Turkey has recently been shown to fall into a group of high-protein foods (including tuna and egg whites) that can help keep post-meal insulin levels within a desirable range.
The feeding of turkeys can make a significant difference in their body composition and health benefits. Recent research has made it clear that the amount of total fat in turkey, the composition of this fat (including its amount of omega-3 fatty acids), and the protein content of turkey all closely depend upon the diet that the turkey has been fed. Studies involving the use of linseed oil (flax oil), fish oil, and coconut oil in poultry feed all show a relationship between these fat-based feed components and the composition of the turkey meat. Interestingly, the use of coconut oil in poultry feed has also been associated with an ability of this ingredient to lower risk of infection in the turkeys from Campylobacter bacteria and Salmonellabacteria. Investigators have hypothesized that it’s the caprylic acid in the coconut oil that may be primarily responsible for this decreased risk of infection.
The physical health of the turkeys prior to slaughter can also make a significant difference in nutrient content. Researchers have recently shown that meat from turkeys fed plant oils containing alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, the basic building block for other more complicated omega-3 fatty acids like EPA and DHA) will only contain these more complicated omega-3 fatty acids if the turkeys were healthy prior to slaughter. In other words, if the turkeys were not in good health at the time when they consumed feed with ALA, their bodies were not capable of metabolizing ALA into EPA and DHA and those more complicated omega-3 fatty acids were not found in the final turkey meat.
WHFoods Recommendations
One of the great advantages of turkey is that much of the fat can be easily removed making it a very lean source of protein. We recommend roasting turkey to keep it moist and bring out is best flavor. Turkey dries out quickly so it is important not to overcook it; it is also important not to undercook it. For more on the Healthiest Way of Cooking Turkey see the How to Enjoy section below. While usually associated with the holidays, turkey can be enjoyed year round. 
 This chart graphically details the %DV that a serving of Turkey provides for each of the nutrients of which it is a good, very good, or excellent source according to our Food Rating System.

TurkeyTurkey

What’s New and Beneficial about Turkey

  • Studies now show a clear difference between intake of red meats (like beef) and intake of white meats (like turkey) with respect to certain activities in our digestive tract. One particularly interesting study has determined that formation of N-nitroso compounds in the large intestine is much more likely to occur from high intake of red meats like beef than from high intake of white meats like turkey. Since excessive formation of N-nitroso compounds is associated with increased risk of colon cancer, this finding points to a special benefit that may be provided by turkey and other white meats in comparison to red meats.
  • Turkey has recently been shown to fall into a group of high-protein foods (including tuna and egg whites) that can help keep post-meal insulin levels within a desirable range.
  • The feeding of turkeys can make a significant difference in their body composition and health benefits. Recent research has made it clear that the amount of total fat in turkey, the composition of this fat (including its amount of omega-3 fatty acids), and the protein content of turkey all closely depend upon the diet that the turkey has been fed. Studies involving the use of linseed oil (flax oil), fish oil, and coconut oil in poultry feed all show a relationship between these fat-based feed components and the composition of the turkey meat. Interestingly, the use of coconut oil in poultry feed has also been associated with an ability of this ingredient to lower risk of infection in the turkeys from Campylobacter bacteria and Salmonellabacteria. Investigators have hypothesized that it’s the caprylic acid in the coconut oil that may be primarily responsible for this decreased risk of infection.
  • The physical health of the turkeys prior to slaughter can also make a significant difference in nutrient content. Researchers have recently shown that meat from turkeys fed plant oils containing alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, the basic building block for other more complicated omega-3 fatty acids like EPA and DHA) will only contain these more complicated omega-3 fatty acids if the turkeys were healthy prior to slaughter. In other words, if the turkeys were not in good health at the time when they consumed feed with ALA, their bodies were not capable of metabolizing ALA into EPA and DHA and those more complicated omega-3 fatty acids were not found in the final turkey meat.

    WHFoods Recommendations

    One of the great advantages of turkey is that much of the fat can be easily removed making it a very lean source of protein. We recommend roasting turkey to keep it moist and bring out is best flavor. Turkey dries out quickly so it is important not to overcook it; it is also important not to undercook it. For more on the Healthiest Way of Cooking Turkey see the How to Enjoy section below. While usually associated with the holidays, turkey can be enjoyed year round. 

    Food Chart 
    This chart graphically details the %DV that a serving of Turkey provides for each of the nutrients of which it is a good, very good, or excellent source according to our Food Rating System.

Video 13 Dec 3 notes

scrambled eggs

(Source: squidoo.com)

Photo 13 Dec 35 notes grilled salmon with tarragon and dill

grilled salmon with tarragon and dill

Photo 13 Dec 24 notes Nutrition of Almonds

Consumers have new reasons to enjoy almonds as researchers have recently announced that nuts not only taste good, but they’re also good for you.
Almonds are one of the most nutritious of all nuts. As more and more consumers become dedicated to healthy life-styles, experts have found that adding natural foods, such as almonds, to your diet may be the prescription for physical wellness in the 21st century.  See this!

Cancer Prevention - Almonds are low in saturated fat and contain many other protective nutrients - calcium and magnesium - for strong bones, vitamin E and compounds called phytochemicals, which may help protect against cardiovascular disease and even cancer.

Phytochemical Powerhouse - Leading nutrition scientists presented their research findings in a symposium entitled “Nuts in a Healthful Diet”, as a part of the 1998 Experimental Biology annual meeting. Dr. Gary Beecher, of the USDA-ARS, has analyzed the phytochemical content of almonds and states, “I have never seen this diversity of phytochemicals in a single food source.” 

Reduce Heart Attack Risk - A Loma Linda School of Public Health study showed those who consumed nuts five times a week had a 50% reduction in risk of heart attack. 

Lower Cholesterol - In one clinical study, Dr. Gene Spiller, Director of the Health Research and Studies Center, Inc., showed that almonds added to the diet had a favorable effect on blood cholesterol levels and that none of the study groups experienced weight gain in the study. 

Some nuts contain rhizveritrol, the anti-inflammatory agent found in red wines and thought to be responsible for the “French paradox”. Many scientists have pointed to the French consumption of red wine as one factor in the lower rate of heart disease despite their diets rich in cream sauces and buttery pastries. The fat in nuts is unsaturated, or the “good” fat and there is no cholesterol in these fats.

If you think almonds are just for satisfying your mid-afternoon munchies, you’re in for a surprise! These tasty tidbits pack a nutritional punch, combining tons of essential nutrients in one very delicious package.

One teeny ounce of almonds contains 12 percent of your daily allowance of protein. And absolutely no cholesterol, of course. You’ll also get 35 percent of your daily allowance of vitamin E, that valuable antioxidant with so many cancer-fighting qualities. And most of the fat in almonds is monounsaturated, also known as the “good” fat.
This little nut is also loaded with minerals like magnesium, phosphorus and zinc, as well as lots of healthy fiber. And don’t forget calcium and folic acid - they’re in there too!
When you get right down to the details, it’s no wonder so may people go nuts for almonds!

20-25 almonds (approximately one ounce) contain as much calcium as 1/4 cup of milk, a valuable tool in preventing osteoporosis.

Almonds are the best whole food source of vitamin E, in the form of alpha-tocopherol, which may help prevent cancer.

If you’re pregnant, or thinking about it, almonds are a great source of the folic acid you need!

Almonds contain more magnesium than oatmeal or even spinach. Are you listening, Popeye?

Build strong bones and teeth with the phosphorus in almonds.

Nutrition of Almonds

Consumers have new reasons to enjoy almonds as researchers have recently announced that nuts not only taste good, but they’re also good for you.

Almonds are one of the most nutritious of all nuts. As more and more consumers become dedicated to healthy life-styles, experts have found that adding natural foods, such as almonds, to your diet may be the prescription for physical wellness in the 21st century.  See this!

Cancer Prevention - Almonds are low in saturated fat and contain many other protective nutrients - calcium and magnesium - for strong bones, vitamin E and compounds called phytochemicals, which may help protect against cardiovascular disease and even cancer.

Phytochemical Powerhouse - Leading nutrition scientists presented their research findings in a symposium entitled “Nuts in a Healthful Diet”, as a part of the 1998 Experimental Biology annual meeting. Dr. Gary Beecher, of the USDA-ARS, has analyzed the phytochemical content of almonds and states, “I have never seen this diversity of phytochemicals in a single food source.” 

Reduce Heart Attack Risk - A Loma Linda School of Public Health study showed those who consumed nuts five times a week had a 50% reduction in risk of heart attack. 

Lower Cholesterol - In one clinical study, Dr. Gene Spiller, Director of the Health Research and Studies Center, Inc., showed that almonds added to the diet had a favorable effect on blood cholesterol levels and that none of the study groups experienced weight gain in the study. 

Some nuts contain rhizveritrol, the anti-inflammatory agent found in red wines and thought to be responsible for the “French paradox”. Many scientists have pointed to the French consumption of red wine as one factor in the lower rate of heart disease despite their diets rich in cream sauces and buttery pastries. The fat in nuts is unsaturated, or the “good” fat and there is no cholesterol in these fats.

If you think almonds are just for satisfying your mid-afternoon munchies, you’re in for a surprise! These tasty tidbits pack a nutritional punch, combining tons of essential nutrients in one very delicious package.

One teeny ounce of almonds contains 12 percent of your daily allowance of protein. And absolutely no cholesterol, of course. You’ll also get 35 percent of your daily allowance of vitamin E, that valuable antioxidant with so many cancer-fighting qualities. And most of the fat in almonds is monounsaturated, also known as the “good” fat.

This little nut is also loaded with minerals like magnesium, phosphorus and zinc, as well as lots of healthy fiber. And don’t forget calcium and folic acid - they’re in there too!

When you get right down to the details, it’s no wonder so may people go nuts for almonds!

20-25 almonds (approximately one ounce) contain as much calcium as 1/4 cup of milk, a valuable tool in preventing osteoporosis.

Almonds are the best whole food source of vitamin E, in the form of alpha-tocopherol, which may help prevent cancer.

If you’re pregnant, or thinking about it, almonds are a great source of the folic acid you need!

Almonds contain more magnesium than oatmeal or even spinach. Are you listening, Popeye?

Build strong bones and teeth with the phosphorus in almonds.

Photo 10 Dec 1 note chocolate coffee souffle

chocolate coffee souffle

Photo 9 Dec 2 notes Crème Brûlèe



INGREDIENTS

15g butter
150g rhubarb, trimmed and chopped
3 tbsp honey
½ vanilla pod, split
250ml double cream
100ml whole milk
4 large free-range egg yolks
50g caster sugar, plus extra to finish
Few drops of vanilla extract




Method


Heat the oven to 140°C/gas mark 1. Stand four ramekins or similar ovenproof dishes (200ml capacity) in a baking tin.


Melt the butter in a wide frying pan. Add the rhubarb, honey and seeds from the vanilla pod.


Cook over a high heat, tossing occasionally, for 5–6 minutes until the rhubarb is soft and the juices and honey have caramelised. Spoon into the ramekins.


Slowly heat the cream and milk together in a saucepan to just below the boil. Meanwhile, whisk the egg yolks, sugar and vanilla extract together in a bowl until evenly blended. Trickle the hot, creamy milk onto the egg mixture, beating constantly, until well combined. Strain the mixture through a fine sieve into a large jug. Skim off any froth from the surface, then pour into the ramekins.


Pour warm water into the baking tin to come halfway up the sides of the ramekins. Bake for about 40–45 minutes until the custards are lightly set. To test, gently shake a ramekin – the custard should still be a little wobbly in the centre. Remove the ramekins from the tin and allow to cool completely, then chill until ready to serve.


For the topping, sprinkle 1–2 tsp sugar evenly on top of each custard, then wave a cook’s blowtorch over the surface to caramelise. Serve at once.

Crème Brûlèe

INGREDIENTS

  • 15g butter
  • 150g rhubarb, trimmed and chopped
  • 3 tbsp honey
  • ½ vanilla pod, split
  • 250ml double cream
  • 100ml whole milk
  • 4 large free-range egg yolks
  • 50g caster sugar, plus extra to finish
  • Few drops of vanilla extract

Method

  1. Heat the oven to 140°C/gas mark 1. Stand four ramekins or similar ovenproof dishes (200ml capacity) in a baking tin.

  2. Melt the butter in a wide frying pan. Add the rhubarb, honey and seeds from the vanilla pod.

  3. Cook over a high heat, tossing occasionally, for 5–6 minutes until the rhubarb is soft and the juices and honey have caramelised. Spoon into the ramekins.

  4. Slowly heat the cream and milk together in a saucepan to just below the boil. Meanwhile, whisk the egg yolks, sugar and vanilla extract together in a bowl until evenly blended. Trickle the hot, creamy milk onto the egg mixture, beating constantly, until well combined. Strain the mixture through a fine sieve into a large jug. Skim off any froth from the surface, then pour into the ramekins.

  5. Pour warm water into the baking tin to come halfway up the sides of the ramekins. Bake for about 40–45 minutes until the custards are lightly set. To test, gently shake a ramekin – the custard should still be a little wobbly in the centre. Remove the ramekins from the tin and allow to cool completely, then chill until ready to serve.

  6. For the topping, sprinkle 1–2 tsp sugar evenly on top of each custard, then wave a cook’s blowtorch over the surface to caramelise. Serve at once.

Photo 8 Dec 7 notes Shepherds pie
Ingredients:
The Filling:
Olive Oil (2 Tbsp)
Ground Lamb or Beef (about 1.5 lbs)
1 Large Carrot (grated)
1 Large Onion (grated)
Fresh Rosemary
Fresh Thyme
Minced Garlic (I used 4 cloves)
Salt
Pepper
Worcestershire Sauce (several splashes)
Tomato Puree or Paste (no more than a small can)
Red Wine (several glugs)
Chicken Stock (not sure, but it looks like about 1/4 cup)
The Mash:
Golden Potatoes (about 1.5 lbs)
Heavy Cream ( 1/4 cup)
Butter (3 1/2 Tbsp)
Salt
Pepper
Egg Yolks (2)
Parmesan Cheese (1/4 cup, minimum)
Prep Work:
Dice the garlic
Separate your herbs from the stems
Separate your Egg Yolks
Peel and Slice your potatoes into even pieces
Open your wine if it’s not already
Open your can of Tomato Paste
Cooking the Potatoes:
This part is easy as pie (no pun intended), just boil some water, throw some salt and your potatoes in, and set a timer for 15 minutes – start on your filling.  Upon the timer going off, take your potatoes out and strain the water off. Put potatoes back into the pan, or into a medium mixing bowl. Mash the potatoes with their ingredients from above and keep warm (your filling should be about done by this point)

Cooking the Filling:
Pour Olive Oil into a hot, rather large pan, then add meat. Stir meat as if your life depends on it for a few minutes so it’s nice and brown, and broken into very small pieces. Add your Rosemary, Thyme, and Garlic, then stir some more. Quickly add your Carrot, and Onion, stir a little longer. The idea at this point is to get everything to a minced consistency.
Add Worcestershire Sauce, stir, add Tomato Puree, stir, add Red Wine and sweat down for a minute or two. Add chicken stock and cook for 3 more minutes. I made mine without the stock because I didn’t notice it the first time I watched the show. You can add it, or leave it out.
Final Instructions:
Scoop your meat mixture into a deep casserole or other oven safe dish and then spoon the mash over the top. Spread the mash over the top of the mix with the bottom of the spoon and then sprinkle a generous portion of Parmesan cheese over the top. Poke the top with a fork several times to give it a peaked look and stick it in the oven at 400 degrees for 18-20 minutes to brown the potatoes and set the pie. Serve it up and watch people melt! Oh I love Shepherd Pie!

Shepherds pie

Ingredients:

The Filling:

  • Olive Oil (2 Tbsp)
  • Ground Lamb or Beef (about 1.5 lbs)
  • 1 Large Carrot (grated)
  • 1 Large Onion (grated)
  • Fresh Rosemary
  • Fresh Thyme
  • Minced Garlic (I used 4 cloves)
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Worcestershire Sauce (several splashes)
  • Tomato Puree or Paste (no more than a small can)
  • Red Wine (several glugs)
  • Chicken Stock (not sure, but it looks like about 1/4 cup)

The Mash:

  • Golden Potatoes (about 1.5 lbs)
  • Heavy Cream ( 1/4 cup)
  • Butter (3 1/2 Tbsp)
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Egg Yolks (2)
  • Parmesan Cheese (1/4 cup, minimum)

Prep Work:

  • Dice the garlic
  • Separate your herbs from the stems
  • Separate your Egg Yolks
  • Peel and Slice your potatoes into even pieces
  • Open your wine if it’s not already
  • Open your can of Tomato Paste

Cooking the Potatoes:

This part is easy as pie (no pun intended), just boil some water, throw some salt and your potatoes in, and set a timer for 15 minutes – start on your filling.  Upon the timer going off, take your potatoes out and strain the water off. Put potatoes back into the pan, or into a medium mixing bowl. Mash the potatoes with their ingredients from above and keep warm (your filling should be about done by this point)

Cooking the Filling:

Pour Olive Oil into a hot, rather large pan, then add meat. Stir meat as if your life depends on it for a few minutes so it’s nice and brown, and broken into very small pieces. Add your Rosemary, Thyme, and Garlic, then stir some more. Quickly add your Carrot, and Onion, stir a little longer. The idea at this point is to get everything to a minced consistency.

Add Worcestershire Sauce, stir, add Tomato Puree, stir, add Red Wine and sweat down for a minute or two. Add chicken stock and cook for 3 more minutes. I made mine without the stock because I didn’t notice it the first time I watched the show. You can add it, or leave it out.

Final Instructions:

Scoop your meat mixture into a deep casserole or other oven safe dish and then spoon the mash over the top. Spread the mash over the top of the mix with the bottom of the spoon and then sprinkle a generous portion of Parmesan cheese over the top. Poke the top with a fork several times to give it a peaked look and stick it in the oven at 400 degrees for 18-20 minutes to brown the potatoes and set the pie. Serve it up and watch people melt! Oh I love Shepherd Pie!

Photo 8 Dec 24 notes tandoori chicken

tandoori chicken

Photo 8 Dec 8 notes wedding cake

wedding cake

(Source: )


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